Aircraft Maintenance Technology

APR-MAY 2018

The aircraft maintenance professional's source for technological advancements, maintenance alerts, news, articles, events, and careers

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Integrated Drive Generator (IDG) can take over four weeks to repair, whereas it can be replaced in a matter of three hours. When you consider that you are never more than a day away by air courier from all of the major MRO hubs across the globe, it's clear that shipping parts to the geographically closest market may not make sense. The freight costs may be slightly more, but as a percentage of the total overhaul bill, they are negligible. Similarly, it's a false economy to ship a part to a nearby market that doesn't have the expertise needed to complete the job efficiently. A shop with highly relevant capabilities and experience anywhere in the world is likely to offer better value than a supplier in close range that lacks specialist knowledge and tools. Likewise, a shop in a location with a reliable supply chain may be a better option than a nearby supplier without good part supply. Of course, there will always be certain parts that are too bulky or hazardous that will need to be transported overland and therefore serviced locally, for example, escape slides. However, this is only a very small sample of the thousands of components that operators replace and repair every day. Aside from generating direct cost savings and benefits by going 'long haul' rather than local for parts MRO, airlines and manufacturers are realising that there are a range of 'hidden costs' that can be avoided by taking a more strategic and international approach to their parts maintenance. TAKING AN AGGREGATED APPROACH Sourcing local providers on a case-by case basis leaves operators with the headache of managing a whole host of individual relationships with suppliers within the region, potentially including negotiating language barriers and different customs regimes. This is very time inefficient, and it is also tough for operators to ensure competitive pricing due to a small number of regional suppliers. Time and cost are heavily influenced by the enquiry, logistics, and approval process of sourcing a part, which can add to a minimum of at least six days if contracts and agreements are not in place. In response, airlines and manufacturers are increasingly outsourcing their component MRO to A shop with highly relevant capabilities and experience anywhere in the world is likely to offer better value than a supplier in close range that lacks specialist knowledge and tools. Using an international aggregator means • Streamlined negotiations with pre-existing agreements in place • Fast freight times to anywhere in the world using strategic logistics partners • Being able to avoid countries with onerous customs procedures • Access to the most efficient workshops worldwide, with the fastest TAT's One Scenario for a Component Repair In-region 26 days 20 days International Aggregator Negotiation 3 days On the bench 18 days On the bench 14 days Freight Freight Customs Customs Processing Freight Negotiation Freight Customs Customs Processing This results in vastly reduced wing-to-shelf time AJW www.AviationPros.com 33

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