Aircraft Maintenance Technology

JUN-JUL 2018

The aircraft maintenance professional's source for technological advancements, maintenance alerts, news, articles, events, and careers

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24 JUNE/JULY 2018 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY OUTLOOK advertising, but our current budget makes that very difficult if not impossible at this time.” What New Programs Are Being Offered? Many of the schools interviewed mentioned new avionics programs to meet the needs of the industry. Cape Cod is creating an avionics/aircraft electrical technician program that it hopes to start this fall. ERAU offers an avionics minor. The University of District of Columbia has a new avionics program which includes both FCC GROL and NCATT AET. Aviation Institute of Maintenance is opening its 12th facility in Charlotte, NC, toward the end of the year. Spartan is currently working on an A&P project that will standardize its program offerings across each of its campus locations. It acquired new campuses in Los Angeles in 2014 and Denver in 2016. Other new programs are online offerings and unmanned aircraft systems courses. Northland added a Large Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) course six years ago and is now the leading UAS technician school in the United States. Spartan is now in its third year of offering a hybrid AMT program; it consists of 13 months online, followed by seven months in Tulsa, OK, and is branching out internationally. Southern Illinois University added an online BS degree in aviation maintenance management and also plans to expand its existing unmanned aircraft program. What Is Industry’s Role? Industry involvement has greatly impacted student recruitment, the availability of internships, and the tools and equipment schools need. Companies that offer tours or equipment for training schools open the door to ideas for career choices and future employment.And many schools have advisory boards to keep up on the latest trends and industry needs. “Our schools work closely with the local airlines, repair stations, and manufacturers in order to form those partnerships in order to provide the workforce they need,” says AIM’s Holloway. “We have a great relationship with local industry,” says Tulsa Tech’s Oxley. “They are happy to serve on our advisory committee and have been an important part in our program’s success. We acquire donations from them frequently.” SPARTAN HAS recently received APUs and engines from American and Southwest Airlines that have been incorporated into the powerplant curriculum. Here, students repair a turbine engine. SPARTAN COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY MANY INSTITUTIONS have expanded their avionics programs to meet the needs of the industry, like this one at Fox Valley Technical College in Appleton, WI. FOX VALLEY TECHNICAL COLLEGE Pentagon 2000 Software Inc. Come see us at ACPC Air Carriers Purchasing Conference Orlando, FLORIDA Aug. 18-21

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